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Color - Color vocabulary
Written by richart khalil   

Helmholtz (1821-1894), a German scientist, discovered in 1866 that every color had three dimensions: Hue, value, and intensity. But we waited until the turn of the century for this discovery to have its full impact with Albert Munsell system for the analysis and organization of color. That system is still in use today.

color wheel

Hue
Hue is the color name as it appears in the color wheel; it classifies the color as primary color (red, blue or yellow) or secondary colors (green, orange or purple) and so on. Hue doesn’t indicate whether the color is dark or light, strong or weak.

Value
Value is the lightness or darkness of a color, and it’s probably the most important dimension. Interior spaces need contrasting values in order to feel comfortable, and to show related within elements. Values of one single interior should be related together in order not to blend two objects of a similar value.

The value of a color is determined by tint and shade. Tint is varied by the addition of white to a color, which lightens it without changing the hue. Shade is varied by the addition of black to a color, which darkens it but does not change the hue. 

Intensity
Intensity or chroma, as it is termed by Munsell, simply refers to the amount of pigment in, or the saturation of, a color. It is almost impossible to alter the intensity of a color without altering another of its dimensions.

The Munsell System
This system is most practical one for interior designers. It divides the spectrum into five principal hues: red, yellow, green, blue and purple. Halfway between these hues are five intermediate hues (yellow-red, green-yellow, blue-green, purple-blue, and red-purple) and ten secondary intermediate hues (red-yellow-red, yellow-red-yellow, and so on). The vertical axis is divided into nine gray shades ranging from black (0) to white (10). The colors are also arranged according to intensity, with the pure intensities on the outside of the wheel being neutralized as they approach the center of the wheel.

Any color can be specified as follows: Hue = value/chroma. Where B6/2 is a light grayish blue.

Metamerism
Sample of paint, fabrics, and carpets may differ in hue, value, and/or intensity when placed in different surroundings or under different light conditions. They may match closely under one kind of light, but not under another.

Simultaneous contrast
When hue, value, and intensity affect the area adjacent to them. Each hue projects its complement on the color surrounding it so that surrounding a color with its complement makes it appears much brighter.

There are so many color system and vocabulary which may be of use, but the most important is an understanding of the color wheel and the location of a hue on the wheel, and an understanding of the value and intensity.

Comments (4)Add Comment
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written by GLADNESS KENZI, November 10, 2009
send me all the color wheel notes
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written by Mike Hunt, January 26, 2010
Hey i just wanted to tell you that love color and i can't believe that i have thee honor to look at your website. I love art and want to learn more becuase i want to draw and i love to draw stick figures. I heart art. haha ha i made a joke laugh with me i am a good artist that love art i still can't believe i writing to you.
P.S write back
...
written by interlinings, November 16, 2013
The situation also depends upon the kind of divorce you had, weather it was an amicable one, or was it a rough one where cheating and abusing was involved

woven fusible interlining

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