Skip to content
You are here: Home
Balance PDF Print E-mail
The design process - Understanding the design principles
Written by richart khalil   

Balance is the arrangement of objects so that they seem to be in a state of equilibrium. The kind of balance that is most important in design is the optical balance, perceived through the eyes.
Optical balance has four dimensions: length, height, width and time. Time create movement that allow people to discover new dimensions in every steps within the designed interior, and changes the perceived equilibrium at every step.
A well-designed interior does not lose its equilibrium in any of its dimensions.

The following are basic guidelines for creating balance:

  1. Bright, small objects can balance large grayed areas of color. Bright upholstery and pillows can balance walls, carpet and draperies.
  2. Opaque, warm areas appear larger than transparent, cool ones.
  3. Objects appear heavier when placed above eye level rather than below. Painting should be hung at normal viewing level, or they may appear too heavy.
  4. Unique or unusual objects balance larger plainer ones.
  5. Elaborately ornamented objects create a center of interest and can balance larger, plainer ones.
  6. Matching materials, such as wallpaper, draperies and upholstery conceal architectural details and furniture; contrasting colors emphasize details and furniture.
  7. Materials known to be heavy (such as iron and granite) appear heavy as well.

Visual balance does not need to be very elaborate; sometimes it is attained only by moving the center support or by creating two focal points of different nature.

harmony in color     balance

Symmetrical balance: or formal balance results when both side of an object or space mirrors each others with a natural focal point in the center. The center is emphatic, but the total effect is static, quiet and passive.
Asymmetrical balance: or informal balance is fluid and flexible and, having movement, can direct attention around a space, making it appear larger than it is. Most interiors are designed asymmetrical with some symmetrical components.
Radial balance: is formed when all parts of the whole radiate from a central focal point. Although encountered less frequently than symmetrical or asymmetrical balance, adds an extra dimension to interior space.

Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
quote
bold
italicize
underline
strike
url
image
quote
quote
Smiley
Smiley
Smiley
Smiley
Smiley
Smiley
Smiley
Smiley
Smiley
Smiley
Smiley
Smiley

busy
 
< Prev

Newsletter






Polls