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The design process - Understanding the design principles
Written by richart khalil   

The eye is directly oriented to the dominant or emphasized forms, that is why emphasis is an important component of all design elements.
The many gradations of visual accent and subordination can be divided into three major categories: dominant – forms that have the greatest visual impact – subdominant – forms that support the most important or dominant areas – and subordinate – forms that are relatively unimportant in assessing the total design, yet should be visually interesting and exciting in themselves.

Dominance may be achieved in several ways:

  1. Size: a large piece of furniture is more important than a smaller one.
  2. Color: a bright color, a color surrounded by its complement, or a large area of color is more important than a pastel color, or small areas of color.
  3. Texture: a shiny texture surrounded by rough textures, or the reverse, stands out.
  4. Shape: curved shapes in a room of predominantly rectilinear shapes, or the reverse, makes the contrasting shape more important.
  5. Location: the location of an object will affect its importance.
  6. Ornamentation: a heavily decorated object will increase in importance, just as an extremely simple one will.
  7. Convergence of lines: directional lines can lead the eye naturally to a focal point, making it the center of interest.
  8. Variety: as dominant shapes stands out, it is more usual to apply variety to subordinate forms which can be moved about or changed without disturbing the over-all effect.
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