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Family Home - Children’s rooms
Written by richart khalil   

Both psychological and physical space, a child’s room should provide space for imagination, a springboard for creative activity, a physical space for letting off energy or getting stuck into serious play. As the first private territory, it should serve as a secure base, constant enough to provide a sense of continuity during years of rapid change, but also flexible enough to accommodate each new stage of development and its essential list of must-have items.

Babies:
babies roomFor the first three months, all a baby really requires, is a somewhere to sleep, a changing mat and a minimal amount of storage for toys and clothes. And all you will need is a comfortable chair for feeding and some means of lowering lights levels for nighttime feeding and changing.
Even though babies have little to say on style, they are sensitive to their surroundings. From birth, babies are stimulated by graphic shapes and bright color – especially orangey-red – as well as by musical, brightly colored and mobile toys, necessary for their early conceptual development. 

Pre-school:
Between two and three, most children are ready to move into proper bed. It goes without saying that you should buy the best bed and mattress you can afford.
By this stage, your child possessions are to be placed on visible places, so you should make space for artwork and models and the display of favorite toys. The most used level of pre-school play is floor-level so cover it with a warm, resilient surface.

pre-school room      school age room

 

teen roomSchool-age:
The next mutation of the child’s room occurs during the school years, when it becomes both more of a private refuge and at the same time a social center. Flexible multipurpose furniture such as floor cushions, platform-level beds with study areas underneath and modular storage can all help to rationalize space at this stage. 

Teenagers:
At a time when boundaries are constantly challenged and redefined, a new approach is required when it comes to spatial arrangement. A teenager does not require more space, but more privacy and autonomy. This goes with allowing teenagers to customize their space to their own taste, by reflecting it through decoration and furnishing. 

What may stay constant in all the changing phases of a child room is the need for good organizational systems and skills to keep all styles tendencies under control.

Comments (1)Add Comment
...
written by interlinings, November 16, 2013
Try to focus more on things which are important, especially, whether he likes children or not, or is he responsible enough to be committed with and so on.

interlining china

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